Short Family Tree

a global one name study on the history and genealogy of the short surname

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1
'Near Bolderwood Hill'
"Near Bolderwood Hill"
Oil on canvas board, 9" x 12" painting by Frederick Golden SHORT 
 
2
Advertising Poster for John Gilkes & Sons of 146 North Street, Brighton, Sussex, ENGLAND
Advertising Poster for John Gilkes & Sons of 146 North Street, Brighton, Sussex, ENGLAND
After Conrad H. Leigh - 'Wallpapers and Decorations' (Advertising Poster for John Gilkes & Sons of 146 North Street, Brighton), colour lithograph, approx 119cm x 79cm. 
 
3
Appreciation: SHORT, Elsie
Appreciation: SHORT, Elsie
Written by "Neighbour" 
 
4
Appreciation: SHORT, Samuel Henry
Appreciation: SHORT, Samuel Henry
"The Late Sam SHORT"
By Mrs. E. O. CLARK, Lower Southgate. 
 
5
Australia's First - The Goolwa to Port Elliot Railway
Australia's First - The Goolwa to Port Elliot Railway
The Governor?s plans for the railway were approved by the Colonial Office in June, 1851; the estimated coast was ?21,109. This was a considerable project, because the railway lines, the axles, wheels and turntables - everything required for the creation of a railway - even the cotton waste, had to be ordered from England. The railway lines eventually used were second-hand, having served to transport stores during the Crimean War. Recycling is not a modern concept. It was decided that the gauge for the railway would be five foot, three inches, because at that time both Victoria and New South Wales had decided on this gauge for their proposed railway.

Work commenced in 1851 at Port Elliot, but not without difficulties. Not only was there no local engineering base in South Australia, the Province was short of sawyers to produce the necessary sleepers on which the railway would be laid. The sleepers eventually used were eight-foot lengths of unhewn local eucalypts. They were about seven inches in diameter, and were grooved to accommodate the rails which were screwed to the sleepers with four-and-a-half-inch screws. There were no platelayers to be found anywhere, and so a few carpenters were engaged to supervise gangs of labourers. They were, in fact, building a tramway; the carriages were to be horse-drawn.

Most of the proposed route was through level country. It was only at the terminals that blasting was required. Here Mr Buxton Forbes Laurie, a young chemist, who had experience with explosives, came into his own. Buxton Forbes Laurie was an interesting character. He appears to have been popular every where, and even his wife adored him! Obviously a talented man, he became Superintendent of the Railway on his thirtieth birthday. The next day he was made a Justice of the Peace, and the day after that he became a Magistrate - a man of remarkable talents. He was already one of the great landowners in the district. Now his use of explosives was so successful that the resultant stone from the blasting was sufficient to ballast the entire line and the Port Elliot jetty. In the same year the foundations were laid for large storage sheds at each terminal. These buildings were completed within twelve months. The shed at Port Elliott was a handsome three storied building which remained until 1896. The railway ran to the end of the hundred yard long jetty. Unfortunately, even at the end of this jetty the water was only six feet deep, which meant the goods from the railway had to be transported by way of lighters to the ships which stood further off shore. At Goolwa the line ran at right angles to the wharf, and the trucks had to be swivelled on a turntable to run alongside vessels. From the wharf, the railway ran past the present Post Office, where the verandah served as the passenger station. The railway curved past the Corio Hotel and eventually took the track the railway still follows today, towards Middleton and Port Elliot.

The railway was never officially opened, but by May 1, 1854, the line was fully operational. Goods and passengers were accommodated in eleven wagons and one carriage. Mr Buxton Forbes Laurie had already been Superintendent of the Railway since January 1. His salary was two hundred and fifty pounds a year.

In Australia, this was the first public railway on which carriages travelled on iron rails. It was probably the first in the Southern hemisphere. Certainly Adelaide had to wait until 1865 before the Adelaide to Port Adelaide railway line was operational. The rolling stock consisted of eleven wagons and one passenger carriage. One of the elegant little carriages can be seen today near the Goolwa Post Office. One of the passengers in this vehicle described it - "A quaint, bone-shaking affair it was. A journey in that strange vehicle was an ordeal in endurance..." The writer goes on to suggest that anyone, setting out from Goolwa dressed in black, would arrive in Port Elliot looking as though they "had slept for a week in a flour mill". Apparently, on a good day, the journey from Goolwa to Port Elliot could be completed in fifty minutes.

On the completion of the Goolwa to Port Elliot railway a celebratory dinner was held on March 28, 1855. Mr Buxton Forbes Laurie was Master of Ceremonies, and Mr Nation sang a song which was much appreciated. The company drank to the health of the Governor "with every demonstration of respect."

On April 10 and 11, 1855 a violent storm damaged the breakwater and destroyed twenty yards of the rails. In May another storm tore away sixty yards of rails and undermined the breakwater. Even worse storms followed. Then the new Governor, Sir Richard McDonnell, curtailed expenditure on public works. In spite of these disasters, the Goolwa to Port Elliot railway continued to serve the district until more violent storms seriously damaged the Port Elliot Jetty and ships were wrecked. Those who had argued against Governor Young?s choice of a harbour were proved to be correct in their judgement, and Port Elliot ceased to be an ocean port in December, 1864, when the tram- line extension to Victor Harbor was completed. 
 
6
BENEFIT CONCERT AT NEWTOWN.
BENEFIT CONCERT AT NEWTOWN.
Mrs Clara Guest has arranged a concert to take place at St. George's Hall next Friday night for the benefit of Mrs. Summer-Greene, widow of the late night-offlctr at Lindfleid station. In addition to a bright concert programme, there will be dancing to Happ's String Band. Mr. William Spicer Short is hon. Secrctary. 
 
7
Bigraphy: Short, Gordon Herbert (1912 - 1959)
Bigraphy: Short, Gordon Herbert (1912 - 1959)
SHORT, GORDON HERBERT (1912-1959), press photographer, was born on 23 April 1912 at Petersham, Sydney, youngest of four children of Herbert George Short, a civil servant from England, and his native-born wife Lilian, n?e Greer. Gordon attended Stanmore Public School and in 1928 became a messenger in the pictorial department of the Sydney Morning Herald. Known as 'Shorty', he formally began a cadetship in 1930 and moved quickly from the duties of the darkroom into general photography. He covered the 1934 royal tour of the Duke of Gloucester, from Melbourne to Sydney. His photograph of the duke opening the Anzac Memorial in Hyde Park was the largest photograph that the Herald had ever published, wrapped around the entire paper. As the 1930s advanced so did his skill. 
 
8
Biography: DOUST, David
Biography: DOUST, David

(28th October 1836-19th January 1937)


Biography about David DOUST and his achievments in Australia.

 
 
9
Biography: LAURIE, Buxton Forbes
Biography: LAURIE, Buxton Forbes
Buxton Forbes Laurie, was one of the earliest vignerons south of Adelaide, planting his first vines in 1853. He then built a winery, Southcote, and gained his distillation license in 1863. Much of the wine was bottled and sent to England. Buxton died in 1876. His widow, Mary Laurie, continued the business and is believed to have been the first registered lady vig. 
 
10
CHILD JUMPS FROM SPEEDING TRAIN
CHILD JUMPS FROM SPEEDING TRAIN
Severe Injuries
Elsie Short (11), of English Street, Carlton, was severely injured when she jumped from an electric train travelling at a high speed as it was passing through the Carlton Railway Station this afternoon. She jumped from the open doorway of a carriage on to the platform, rolling over many times as she struck the ground. The child suffered
concussion, a broken left arm, and severe cuts to her head and legs. 
 
11
CONCERT AT SUMMER HILL
CONCERT AT SUMMER HILL
On Friday evening last a successful musical and literary entertainment was held at the Summer Hill Methodist Church in aid of ttie Dalmar Home, Croydon when the Rev Dr Seljors presided. Those who assisted were Mesdames Brookes and Burnett, Misses Timms, Taylor, Mitchell, Peters, and M'Farlane. Messrs. Cavill, Hogg, Morgan, and Westbrook. Miss Gerty Timms acted as accompanist, and Mr W Spicer Short musical director The Sunday school scholars gave two interesting items-the "Robin" song and "Twining" - and Taylor's Banjo Club gave four pieces. 
 
12
Early White Rock Settlers
Early White Rock Settlers
The following item was published in Carillon Chimes, the journal of the Family History Group of Bathurst Inc. in December 1986.

I have tried to copy it exactly so hope I haven't introduced any typos. 
 
13
EDDY MEMORIAL FUND
EDDY MEMORIAL FUND
TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD.
Sir,-We beg leave to draw your attention to list of our monthly relief to orphans and widows of deceased railway and tramway employees, and to ask your kind co-operition in our endeavour to give them some special Christmas relief, and so make tho season a little more bright and happy for the widows and their fatherless children.
All donations to this special object will bo thankfully acknowledged.
I am etc.,
WILLIAM SPICER SHORT.
Dec 7
Hon. Secretary.
 
14
Extracts from 'The SPICER FAMILY of White Rock, BATHURST 1823 - 1883' by Bruce W. THOMAS 1975
Extracts from "The SPICER FAMILY of White Rock, BATHURST 1823 - 1883" by Bruce W. THOMAS 1975
 
 
15
Funeral Notice - Ronald Hunter SHORT
Funeral Notice - Ronald Hunter SHORT
 
 
16
GIRL JUMPS FROM TRAIN
GIRL JUMPS FROM TRAIN
SYDNEY, Thursday.-Elsie Short, aged 11 years, of English street, Carlton, joined a train at Hurstville station to go to Carlton. The train did not stop at Carlton us she had expected, and she jumped out on to the platform as the train dashed past at a speed of nearly 40 miles an hour. She received concussion, a broken left arm, and severe cuts to her head and legs. 
 
17
Goulburn Post - Inquest into death (Transcript)
Goulburn Post - Inquest into death (Transcript)
 
 
18
HOTCHKISS/LEONARD Marriage
HOTCHKISS/LEONARD Marriage
Contributed by John Johnston 
 
19
James SHORT - Astronomer - Searching the southern skies
James SHORT - Astronomer - Searching the southern skies
Details James SHORT and his involvement with mapping over 1 million stars in the southern skies. 
 
20
Lady Juliana (aka the Lady Julian)
Lady Juliana (aka the Lady Julian)
Was a convict ship that dispatched in 1789 from Britain to Australia. She was the first convict ship to arrive at Port Jackson in New South Wales after the First Fleet.

She is therefore sometimes considered as part of the Second Fleet and sometimes not.

The ship was 401 tons and was chartered to transport female convicts. 
 
21
At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
 
 
22
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
ARTHUR HERBERT SPICER SHORT, of Federal, Farmer (No. 23293). A second Account and Plan of Distribution showing payment of an equalising dividend to the extent of one shilling and one penny one-eighth of a penny is the pound on one concurrent claim proved since the filing of the last account. 
 
23
MARY WADE TO US
1778 - 1986
A Family History
MARY WADE TO US 1778 - 1986 A Family History
To the memory of our founding mother
Mary Ann Wade
and
to the pioneers of her family who through
courage and conviction formed a path
for us to follow. 
 
24
MR. J. T. SHORT DEAD
MR. J. T. SHORT DEAD
Former Commissioner of Railways 
 
25
Out of the Holliday Closet!
Out of the Holliday Closet!

Written by Virginia Stokes and updated April 2006


This information has been written for all those members of the Holliday - Porter clan who are interested in their forebears with apologies to those receiving this who are not. Evidence strongly points to the fact that there was not one but two skeletons lurking in the Holiday- Porter rectory closet. They have now both come out! Not only did Henry Thomas Holliday have a convict ancestor but also his wife Mary Porter!

 
 
26
Pirie Street Methodist Church
Pirie Street Methodist Church
The Pirie Street Methodist Church, located behind the Adelaide Town Hall, was the 'cathedral church' of Methodism in the city. Built in 1850, it could seat 800 downstairs, and an additional 400 in the galleries. In 1969 Pirie Street merged with nearby Stow Congregational Church, an early step in what was to become the Uniting Church. In 1972 the church was closed and demolished to make way for the Colonel Light Centre.  
 
27
Prisoners of War in France 1804-1814
Prisoners of War in France 1804-1814
by John Tregerthen SHORT & Thomas WILLIAMS 
 
28
Richard and Paulina Short 
 - Written by Harold Short
Richard and Paulina Short - Written by Harold Short
 
 
29
SHORT, Frederick Golden
SHORT, Frederick Golden
Biography 
 
30
SS GOTHENBURG
SS GOTHENBURG
SS Gothenburg docked at Port Adelaide wharf after her lengthening in 1873. 
 
31
Stream, New Forest
Stream, New Forest
Oil on canvas board, 11" x 15" painting by Frederick Golden SHORT 
 
32
The Illegitimate Child
The Illegitimate Child
What is believed to have happened.

William's disappearance from the Law Lists for some years after 20 May 1803 suggests that he was either in gaol, overseas, or went off with his new daughter (and perhaps also her mother) to Hertfordshire to lay low for a while to avoid the scandal of his having an illegitimate child. The Law List was published only about 4 months after his daughter was born on 23 December 1803. So, the child would have been conceived some 9 months previously around 23 March 1803. William, then aged only about 23, might not have known the mother of Celia was "expecting" at the time he put his name down for the list published on 20 May. In other words, the "scandal" of his illegitimate child might not have hit the fan at this time.

After the passage of a few years and memories had faded somewhat, William returned to London about February 1807 with his daughter Celia from Hertfordshire and placed her in the foster care of Samuel WEBB and his wife Celia. The last mentioned two people were cited as the parents of the child, when she was baptized in London on 3 March 1807. She was then four years old. The child had been born in the town of Elstree or the village of Aldenham, Hertfordshire.

St Martin in the Fields, Westminster was where Celia Roubel KING, alias WEBB was baptised on 3 March 1807.

It is my hypothesis that Celia Roubel KING, alias WEBB, was in fact the natural child of a Miss KING and William ROUBEL and was raised by a foster parents named Samuel and Celia WEBB, who are mentioned at her 1807 baptismal ceremony. Alternatively, Celia WEBB, nee KING, could have been the natural mother of the child and had subsequently married Samuel WEBB prior to the christening. The 1871 census records the birthplace of Celia Roubel SMALL as Elstree.  
 
33
THE SHORT FAMILY - 'ERNIE SHORT'S MEMORIES'
THE SHORT FAMILY - "ERNIE SHORT'S MEMORIES"
Written by Rod Kennedy, Ulmarra, New South Wales, AUSTRALIA 
 
34
The Spicer Family of White Rock, Bathurst - EXTRACT -
The Spicer Family of White Rock, Bathurst - EXTRACT -
Death of Elizabeth SHORT nee Spicer 
 
35
The Spicer Family of White Rock, Bathurst - EXTRACT -
The Spicer Family of White Rock, Bathurst - EXTRACT -
Elizabeth Spicer and Walter SHORT married 
 
36
TRIAL OF JOHN SHORT - A CONVICT, 1828
TRIAL OF JOHN SHORT - A CONVICT, 1828

Second day, Friday 11 April - Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr Sergeant Arabin.


809. JOHN SHORT was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Moores, on 12th of March, at Pinner, and stealing therein 1 watch, value 3/-; 2 shirts, value 4s; 8 shillings, 4 sovereigns, and two 5/- Bank notes, his property.


WILLIAM MOORES. I rent a little ground - my dwelling-house is in the parish of Pinner, in Middlesex. I have known the prisoner seven or eight years; he once lived servant with me, as a labourer, in my farm - he slept in my house and knew the premises well. On the 12th of March I went out at nine or ten o`clock in the morning, leaving my wife at home; I returned about eleven o`clock, or half-past, and found a pane of glass has been pushed in, which was secure when I went out; anybody by pushing it in could put their arm in and unbolt the door. I missed a watch from the head of the bed; it was worth 3/-; I missed two shirts, worth 4s; four sovereigns, and some silver from between two beds, where I kept them, and two 5/- notes; I had seen them safe the morning before; they were all covered up together. I told a constable of it and he found my watch and shirt.


FANNY GREENFIELD. My husband is a labourer, and lives at Pinner. On the 12th of March, about eleven o`clock, I saw the prisoner at Pinner, coming in a direction from Moore's house - he was coming across Mr Hill's field, and was waling quiet fast; he was about a quarter of a mile from Moores'; my landlady was with me: we made some observation about the prisoner, which he must have heard; I turned round and said, "Lord, there is Jack Short;" I knew him very well, but had not seen him about Pinner for a long while; he turned when he heard me speak, and walked briskly away.


WILLIAM CROSS. I am a constable of Aylesbury. I saw a paragraph in the New Hue and Cry on the 21st of March, stating this robbery, and that John Short was suspected. I went to the pawnbroker's to make inquiry, and found nothing; I went from there to where the prisoner had lodged for a few days that week - I had seen him near the house on the morning of that day myself, and several times in the course of that week, and while I was in the house, speaking to the landlady, the pawnbroker's boy fetched me; I went to the pawnbroker's and found the prisoner there, offering a watch in pawn: the shopman produced it in his presence, and said that he had come to pawn it; the prisoner said nothing to that - I said to him, "That is Mr Moores' watch"; he said, "No, it is not - it is my own"; I said, "Where did you get it?" he said he bought it in London; I asked him in what street; he said he did not know: I asked what number, and he did not know; I took him to my own house, stripped him, and on his person found this shirt, with the initials W.M. on it; I secured him.


WILLIAM MOORES. This is my watch, and this is my shirt; they are what I lost that day.


GUILTY - DEATH. Aged 26. Of stealing in the dwelling house, but not of breaking and entering.

 
 
37
WEDDING - SHORT - FORDHAM
WEDDING - SHORT - FORDHAM