Short Family Tree

a global one name study on the history and genealogy of the short surname

Thomas SPICER

Thomas SPICER

Male 1782 - 1848  (65 years)

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  • Name Thomas SPICER 
    Born 19 Jan 1782  "Spout Farm", Dowbiggin, West Yorkshire, ENGLAND Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Christened 19 Jan 1782  Sedburgh, Yorkshire Dales, ENGLAND Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 18 Jan 1848  White Rock, New South Wales, AUSTRALIA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I02737  Short Family Tree | John Richard SHORT & Descendants
    Last Modified 9 Oct 2008 

    Father Edmund SPICER,   b. 13 Oct 1744, "Spout Farm", Dowbiggin, West Yorkshire, ENGLAND Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1816  (Age 71 years) 
    Mother Elizabeth LAMB,   b. 1758, Dent, Yorkshire, ENGLAND Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11816  (Age 58 years) 
    Married 4 May 1779  Sedburgh, Yorkshire Dales, ENGLAND Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F0904  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Leah GREENFIELD,   b. 1787, Burpham, Sussex, ENGLAND Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Aug 1866, at daughter Jane Jelbart's house, Bathurst, New South Wales, AUSTRALIA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years) 
    Married 17 Oct 1814  Saint Lukes Parish, Chelsea, Middlesex, ENGLAND Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Elizabeth SPICER,   b. May 1819, London, ENGLAND Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Sep 1883, Petersham Road, Marrickville, New South Wales, AUSTRALIA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 64 years)
     2. Edmund SPICER,   b. 1820, ENGLAND Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Feb 1853, White Rock, New South Wales, AUSTRALIA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 33 years)
    +3. John SPICER,   b. 1821,   d. 13 Feb 1880, O'Connell, New South Wales, AUSTRALIA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 59 years)
    +4. Margaret SPICER,   b. 9 Feb 1828, Newcastle, New South Wales, AUSTRALIA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Apr 1853, Bathurst, New South Wales, AUSTRALIA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 25 years)
    +5. Jane SPICER,   b. 05 May 1831, White Rock, New South Wales, AUSTRALIA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1899, Bindogundra, New South Wales, AUSTRALIA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 67 years)
    Family ID F0029  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 19 Jan 1782 - "Spout Farm", Dowbiggin, West Yorkshire, ENGLAND Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChristened - 19 Jan 1782 - Sedburgh, Yorkshire Dales, ENGLAND Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 17 Oct 1814 - Saint Lukes Parish, Chelsea, Middlesex, ENGLAND Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 18 Jan 1848 - White Rock, New South Wales, AUSTRALIA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Documents
    Baptism Record of Elizabeth SHORT (nee SPICER)
    Baptism Record of Elizabeth SHORT (nee SPICER)
    23 May 1819

    Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas & Leah SPICER

    Abode: North Street

    Fathers Trade: Soldier

    By whom the ceremony was performed: The Curate

    Histories
    Extracts from 'The SPICER FAMILY of White Rock, BATHURST 1823 - 1883' by Bruce W. THOMAS 1975
    Thomas SPICER 1782 - 1848
    Extract from "The SPICER FAMILY of White Rock, BATHURST 1823 - 1883" by Bruce W. THOMAS 1975

    Born in 1782, at 'Spout Farm, near the village of Dowbeggin, Thomas, second son of Edmund and Elizabeth SPICER, grew up to love his village and the surrounding district. When he became of age he followed his elder brother's example and joined the 1st Life Guards, the Royal Household Cavalry regiment. After a period of loyal service as part of the King's bodyguard, SPICER saw service with his regiment on the Continent during the Peninsular War.

    To protect the person of the King was an important part of the duties required of the Household Cavalry. There were a number of serious incidents in London about the turn of the century. As yet there was no regular police force and the metropolis was not the orderly place it became later. Even the King was not safe on his journeys and on 27 October, 1795, while in his coach on the way to the House of Lords, he was shot at. The King was quite unperturbed, but he did signal to The Life Guards escorting him to prevent the mob from crowding in too closely to his coach. On the same day, in a coach without escort, on the short drive from St James?s Palace to Buckingham House, he was stoned. A most serious situation was only prevented by the quick thinking and action of a bystander who rushed to the barracks, and the instant readiness of The Life Guards, who came out at a gallop and dispersed the crowd.

    William Spicer SHORT, in a letter to his English cousin, wrote that his mother, formerly Elizabeth SPICER, often told of an incident which involved her father, Thomas SPICER, while he was serving as one of the King?s bodyguard.

    One day the King was out driving in a coach accompanied, as usual, by a few members of the Household Cavalry acting as his bodyguard. ?The escort, riding quietly at a respectful distance behind the King, heard his call for help. They galloped up to see two footpads dragging His Majesty from the royal carriage.? Thomas SPICER and the others ?seized the footpads and would have handed them over to the authorities to be dealt with but the King said, ?Thrash them and let them go.? This was done and they were released, battered and bruised. They quickly made tracks and were not seen again.?

    Thomas SPICER married twice. Unfortunately the name of this first wife has been forgotten.

    Thomas SPICER and Leah GREENFIELD married
    Thomas SPICER, widower, and Leah GREENFIELD, spinster, both of the parish of St Lukes, Chelsea, Middlesex, ENGLAND, were married by banns on the 17 October, 1814, by the Revd John RUSH, curate of the parish. As this event occurred at the end of the Peninsular War and before Waterloo, Thomas was probably home on leave. John ALLPRESS and Mary BROOKFIELD signed the marriage register as witnesses.

    Thomas SPICER and Waterloo
    Although there is a family tradition that Thomas SPICER fought in the battle of Waterloo, had his horse shot from under him, contended with a Frenchman for another mount and won, this may not be true. For this account is denied by a stronger tradition that Thomas broke his leg just before the great battle. The walking stick he is said to have used while convalescing is at present owned by Mr Harold JELBART, of ?Penryn?, Trewilga, near Peak Hill, N.S.W. This seems to be the more likely story, especially as the name Thomas SPICER does not appear on the Muster Roll of those present at the battle.

    Thomas SPICER and The Third Regiment of Foot, ?The Buffs?
    After Waterloo, Thomas SPICER transferred to His Majesty?s 3rd Regiment of Foot, (better known as ?The Buffs? because of the colour of the facings on their uniform.) This famous regiment arrived in France just after the battle and served as an army of occupation. Thomas and his regiment remained in France for three years.

    In the autumn of 1818, the regiment was ordered first to England and then to keep the peace in Ireland, where it arrived in November, 1818. Thomas and his regiment remained in Belfast and Newry for three years and returned to England in September, 1821.

    There is mention in a letter written by Robert HISCO to William Spicer SHORT that Thomas SPICER had four children but could secure passage on a ship for three. Then one died and the parents and their remaining children sailed shortly afterwards. We are not told if these were issue of his first or second wife. We do not know when or where they travelled by ship. The children could have been young Elizabeth, Edmund and John. We are certain, however, that about 1822, Thomas SPICER sailed for New South Wales and at least two of his children by his second wife were born here.

    SPICER?S Regiment ordered to New South Wales
    The Third Regiment was ordered to New South Wales in small detachments as guards over convicts, a period of service unique in the records of the regiment. During the autumn of 1821, it was split up into detachments which ere not reunited again until 1928.

    The first detachment sailed in November, 1821, in two ships, Southworth and Shipley and arrived in N.S.W. early in March, 1822. The second detachment sailed in January, 1822 for Van Diemen?s Land on board the Phoenix and arrived at the end of May. Three further detachments left in March, June and July, 1822. Details of the departure of the remainder of the regiment are missing from the official records; but part of the regiment must have sailed at the end of 1822, or early 1823, Major Charles William WALL is shown as arriving at Sydney with headquarters, whilst the balance of the regiment is shown as being still en route. Colonel STEWART had been granted leave, and Major WALL was temporarily in command. Thomas SPICER probably arrived with the headquarters of the regiment. It was not until 27 August 1823, nearly two years after the departure of the first party, that the last batch of the regiment reached Sydney. This last detachment brought with them the colours of the regiment. William STEWART, commanding office of the regiment, returned from leave and arrived in N.S.W. on board the transport, Asia, on 29 April, 1825. STEWART was Lieutenant Governor of the Colony from April, 1825, until December 1827. From evidence in SPICER?S letters we can be certain that Thomas SPICER arrived in New South Wales between 1822, and 1824, probably 1823.

    The colony, at this time, was in a somewhat lawless state, the country districts being infested with parties of bandits and bushrangers, recruited mainly from the ranks of escaped convicts. The detachments, therefore, in addition to guarding the prisoners in the recognised settlements, the chief of which was at Port Macquarie, were frequently called upon to support the troopers in rounding up these gangs of outlaws. Between 1822, and 1827, parties of the Buffs were stationed, more or less permanently, at Parramatta, Liverpool, Newcastle, Port Macquarie, Wellington Valley, Botany Bay Head (Bear Island?) and Bathurst.

    By 1826, some of the regiment were getting old. Governor Sir Ralph Darling writing of the men says:
    ?Many of the men appear to be old and to have suffered from Service, and it may be desirable to discharge some of them who have large families and wish to remain here before they proceed to India.?


    The average age of men in the Buffs was just over thirty one years and in 1824, Thomas SPICER was aged forty two and probably had served as a soldier for twenty four years. In the regiment there were 96 men who had served during the Peninsular War and there were 91 who were over thirty five years of age.

    Thomas SPICER was honourably discharged from the Buffs in 1824.

    Following his discharge from the Third Regiment, Thomas SPICER joined the N.S.W. Veteran Corps and was promoted to the rank of sergeant.

    New South Wales Veteran Corps
    The New South Wales Veteran Corps was formed by Governor Macquarie in 1810. Volunteers from Macquarie?s 73rd Regiment elected to remain in Sydney when their tour of duty expired. They were men of long service who had been engaged in civil duties and the administration of the infant colony. Approval from England was obtained to form these men into a Veterans? Corps, which was to be under the command of whatever regiment was stationed in the colony for the time being. The uniform was that of Macquarie?s 73rd Regiment except that the facings were of blue.
    The Spicer Family of White Rock, Bathurst - EXTRACT -
    The Spicer Family of White Rock, Bathurst - EXTRACT -
    Death of Elizabeth SHORT nee Spicer
    The Spicer Family of White Rock, Bathurst - EXTRACT -
    The Spicer Family of White Rock, Bathurst - EXTRACT -
    Elizabeth Spicer and Walter SHORT married

    Location Photo's
    <b>'Spout Farm', Dowbeggin, West Yorkshire, ENGLAND.</b>
    'Spout Farm', Dowbeggin, West Yorkshire, ENGLAND.
    Name plaque on Spout Cottage
    <b>'Spout Farm', Dowbeggin, West Yorkshire, ENGLAND</b>
    'Spout Farm', Dowbeggin, West Yorkshire, ENGLAND
    Living room at Spout Cottage
    <b>'Spout Farm', Dowbeggin, West Yorkshire, ENGLAND</b>
    'Spout Farm', Dowbeggin, West Yorkshire, ENGLAND
    Spout Cottage Living Room stove/fire circa 1965
    <b>'Spout Farm', Dowbeggin, West Yorkshire, ENGLAND</b>
    'Spout Farm', Dowbeggin, West Yorkshire, ENGLAND
    North East corner of Spout Cottage.
    <b>'Spout Farm', Dowbeggin, West Yorkshire, ENGLAND</b>
    'Spout Farm', Dowbeggin, West Yorkshire, ENGLAND
    Front view of Spout Cottage.
    <b>'Spout Farm', Dowbeggin, West Yorkshire, ENGLAND</b>
    'Spout Farm', Dowbeggin, West Yorkshire, ENGLAND
    Spout Cottage
    <b>'Spout Farm', Dowbeggin, West Yorkshire, ENGLAND</b>
    'Spout Farm', Dowbeggin, West Yorkshire, ENGLAND
    Spout opposite Spout Cottage.
    <b>'Spout Farm', Dowbeggin, West Yorkshire, ENGLAND</b>
    'Spout Farm', Dowbeggin, West Yorkshire, ENGLAND
    Spout Cottage.
    <b>'Spout Farm', Dowbeggin, West Yorkshire, ENGLAND</b>
    'Spout Farm', Dowbeggin, West Yorkshire, ENGLAND
    Spout Cottage.
    <b>'Spout Farm', Dowbeggin, West Yorkshire, ENGLAND</b>
    'Spout Farm', Dowbeggin, West Yorkshire, ENGLAND
    Spout Cottage.